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“A masterpiece” (The Guardian) from the Nobel Prize–winning writer, an oral history of children’s experiences in World War II across Russia

NAMED ONE OF THE BEST BOOKS OF THE YEAR BY THE WASHINGTON POST

For more than three decades, Svetlana Alexievich has been the memory and conscience of the twentieth century. When the Swedish Academy awarded her the Nobel Prize, it cited her for inventing “a new kind of literary genre,” describing her work as “a history of emotions . . . a history of the soul.” 

Bringing together dozens of voices in her distinctive style, Last Witnesses is Alexievich’s collection of the memories of those who were children during World War II. They had sometimes been soldiers as well as witnesses, and their generation grew up with the trauma of the war deeply embedded—a trauma that would change the course of the Russian nation. 

Collectively, this symphony of children’s stories, filled with the everyday details of life in combat, reveals an altogether unprecedented view of the war. Alexievich gives voice to those whose memories have been lost in the official narratives, uncovering a powerful, hidden history from the personal and private experiences of individuals. 

Translated by the renowned Richard Pevear and Larissa Volokhonsky, Last Witnesses is a powerful and poignant account of the central conflict of the twentieth century, a kaleidoscopic portrait of the human side of war.

Praise for Last Witnesses

“There is a special sort of clear-eyed humility to [Alexievich’s] reporting.” The Guardian

“A bracing reminder of the enduring power of the written word to testify to pain like no other medium. . . . Children survive, they grow up, and they do not forget. They are the first and last witnesses.” The New Republic

“A profound triumph.” —The Big Issue

“[Alexievich] excavates and briefly gives prominence to demolished lives and eradicated communities. . . . It is impossible not to turn the page, impossible not to wonder whom we next might meet, impossible not to think differently about children caught in conflict.” The Washington Post

Review

Praise for Svetlana Alexievich, the winner of the Nobel Prize in Literature “for her polyphonic writings, a monument to suffering and courage in our time”

“[Svetlana] Alexievich presents less a straightforward oral history of World War II than a literary excavation of memory itself.” The New York Times Book Review

“Alexievich has forged her own distinctive identity: as a witness to witnesses who usually go unheard. . . . In a ‘post-truth’ era when journalism is under pressure—susceptible to propaganda, sensationalism, and ‘alternative facts’—the power of documentary literature stands out more clearly than ever. . . . Listen to Alexievich.” The Atlantic

“[Alexievich’s] books are woven from hundreds of interviews, in a hybrid form of reportage and oral history that has the quality of a documentary film on paper. But Alexievich is anything but a simple recorder and transcriber of found voices; she has a writerly voice of her own which emerges from the chorus she assembles, with great style and authority, and she shapes her investigations of Soviet and post-Soviet life and death into epic dramatic chronicles as universally essential as Greek tragedies. . . . A mighty documentarian and a mighty artist.” The New Yorker

“Alexievich has gained probably the world’s deepest, most eloquent understanding of the post-Soviet condition. . . . [She] has consistently chronicled that which has been intentionally forgotten.” —Masha Gessen

“Alexievich stations herself at a crossroads of history and turns on her tape recorder. The result is oral history that at times can feel more authentic than narrated history. Alexievich makes it feel intimate, as if you are sitting in the kitchen with the characters, sharing in their happiness and agony.” The Washington Post

“Alexievich’s witnesses are those who haven’t had a say. She shows us from these conversations, many of them coming at the confessional kitchen table of Russian apartments, that it’s powerful simply to be allowed to tell one’s own story. This is the kind of history, otherwise almost unacknowledged by today’s dictatorships, that matters.” The Christian Science Monitor

About the Author

Svetlana Alexievich was born in Ivano-Frankivsk, Ukraine, in 1948 and has spent most of her life in the Soviet Union and present-day Belarus, with prolonged periods of exile in Western Europe. Starting out as a journalist, she developed her own nonfiction genre, which gathers a chorus of voices to describe a specific historical moment. Her works include The Unwomanly Face of War (1985), Last Witnesses (1985), Zinky Boys (1990), Voices from Chernobyl (1997), and Secondhand Time (2013). She has won many international awards, including the 2015 Nobel Prize in Literature “for her polyphonic writings, a monument to suffering and courage in our time.”

Excerpt. © Reprinted by permission. All rights reserved.

“He was afraid to look back . . .”

Zhenya Belkevich

Six years old. Now a worker.

June 1941 . . .

I remember it. I was very little, but I remember everything . . .

The last thing I remember from the peaceful life was a fairy tale that mama read us at bedtime. My favorite one—about the Golden Fish. I also always asked something from the Golden Fish: “Golden Fish . . . Dear Golden Fish . . .” My sister asked, too. She asked differently: “By order of the pike, by my like . . .” We wanted to go to our grandmother for the summer and have papa come with us. He was so much fun.

In the morning I woke up from fear. From some unfamiliar sounds . . .

Mama and papa thought we were asleep, but I lay next to my sister pretending to sleep. I saw papa kiss mama for a long time, kiss her face and hands, and I kept wondering: he’s never kissed her like that before. They went outside, they were holding hands, I ran to the window—­mama hung on my father’s neck and wouldn’t let him go. He tore free of her and ran, she caught up with him and again held him and shouted something. Then I also shouted: “Papa! Papa!”

My little sister and brother Vasya woke up, my sister saw me crying, and she, too, shouted: “Papa!” We all ran out to the porch: “Papa!” Father saw us and, I remember it like today, covered his head with his hands and walked off, even ran. He was afraid to look back.

The sun was shining in my face. So warm . . . And even now I can’t believe that my father left that morning for the war. I was very little, but I think I realized that I was seeing him for the last time. That I would never meet him again. I was very . . . very little . . .

It became connected like that in my memory, that war is when there’s no papa . . .

Then I remember: the black sky and the black plane. Our mama lies by the road with her arms spread. We ask her to get up, but she doesn’t. She doesn’t rise. The soldiers wrapped mama in a tarpaulin and buried her in the sand, right there. We shouted and begged: “Don’t put our mama in the ground. She’ll wake up and we’ll go on.” Some big beetles crawled over the sand . . . I couldn’t imagine how mama was going to live with them under the ground. How would we find her afterward, how would we meet her? Who would write to our papa?

One of the soldiers asked me: “What’s your name, little girl?” But I forgot. “And what’s your last name, little girl? What’s your mother’s name?” I didn’t remember . . . We sat by mama’s little mound till night, till we were picked up and put on a cart. The cart was full of children. Some old man drove us, he gathered up everybody on the road. We came to a strange village and strangers took us all to different cottages.

I didn’t speak for a long time. I only looked.

Then I remember—­summer. Bright summer. A strange woman strokes my head. I begin to cry. I begin to speak . . . To tell about mama and papa. How papa ran away from us and didn’t even look back . . . How mama lay . . . How the beetles crawled over the sand . . .

The woman strokes my head. In those moments I realized: she looks like my mama . . .

“My first and last cigarette . . .”

Gena Yushkevich

Twelve years old. Now a journalist.

The morning of the first day of the war . . .

Sun. And unusual quiet. Incomprehensible silence.

Our neighbor, an officer’s wife, came out to the yard all in tears. She whispered something to mama, but gestured that they had to be quiet. Everybody was afraid to say aloud what had happened, even when they already knew, since some had been informed. But they were afraid that they’d be called provocateurs. Panic-­mongers. That was more frightening than the war. They were afraid . . . This is what I think now . . . And of course no one believed it. What?! Our army is at the border, our leaders are in the Kremlin! The country is securely protected, it’s invulnerable to the enemy! That was what I thought then . . . I was a young Pioneer.

We listened to the radio. Waited for Stalin’s speech. We needed his voice. But Stalin was silent. Then Molotov gave a speech. Everybody listened. Molotov said, “It’s war.” Still no one believed it yet. Where is Stalin?

Planes flew over the city . . . Dozens of unfamiliar planes. With crosses. They covered the sky, covered the sun. Terrible! Bombs rained down . . . There were sounds of ceaseless explosions. Rattling. Everything was happening as in a dream. Not in reality. I was no longer little—­I remember my feelings. My fear, which spread all over my body. All over my words. My thoughts. We ran out of the house, ran somewhere down the streets . . . It seemed as if the city was no longer there, only ruins. Smoke. Fire. Somebody said we must run to the cemetery, because they wouldn’t bomb a cemetery. Why bomb the dead? In our neighborhood there was a big Jewish cemetery with old trees. And everybody rushed there, thousands of people gathered there. They embraced the monuments, hid behind the tombstones.

Mama and I sat there till nightfall. Nobody around uttered the word war. I heard another word: provocation. Everybody repeated it. People said that our troops would start advancing any moment. On Stalin’s orders. People believed it.

But the sirens on the chimneys in the outskirts of Minsk wailed all night . . .

The first dead . . .

The first dead I saw was a horse . . . Then a dead woman . . . That surprised me. My idea was that only men were killed in war.

I woke up in the morning . . . I wanted to leap out of bed, then I remembered—­it’s war, and I closed my eyes. I didn’t want to believe it.

There was no more shooting in the streets. Suddenly it was quiet. For several days it was quiet. And then all of a sudden there was movement . . . There goes, for instance, a white man, white all over, from his shoes to his hair. Covered with flour. He carries a white sack. Another is running . . . Tin cans fall out of his pockets, he has tin cans in his hands. Candy . . . Packs of tobacco . . . Someone carries a hat filled with sugar . . . A pot of sugar . . . Indescribable! One carries a roll of fabric, another goes all wrapped in blue calico. Red calico . . . It’s funny, but nobody laughs. Food warehouses had been bombed. A big store not far from our house . . . People rushed to take whatever was left there. At a sugar factory several men drowned in vats of sugar syrup. Terrible! The whole city cracked sunflower seeds. They found a stock of sunflower seeds somewhere. Before my eyes a woman came running to a store . . . She had nothing with her: no sack or net bag—­so she took off her slip. Her leggings. She stuffed them with buckwheat. Carried it off. All that silently for some reason. Nobody talked.

When I called my mother, there was only mustard left, yellow jars of mustard. “Don’t take anything,” mama begged. Later she told me she was ashamed, because all her life she had taught me differently. Even when we were starving and remembering these days, we still didn’t regret anything. That’s how my mother was.

In town . . . German soldiers calmly strolled in our streets. They filmed everything. Laughed. Before the war we had a favorite game—­we made drawings of Germans. We drew them with big teeth. Fangs. And now they’re walking around . . . Young, handsome . . . With handsome grenades tucked into the tops of their sturdy boots. Play harmonicas. Even joke with our pretty girls.

An elderly German was dragging a box. The box was heavy. He beckoned to me and gestured: help me. The box had two handles, we took it by these handles. When we had brought it where we were told to, the German patted me on the shoulder and took a pack of cigarettes from his pocket. Meaning here’s your pay.

I came home. I couldn’t wait, I sat in the kitchen and lit up a cigarette. I didn’t hear the door open and mama come in.

“Smoking, eh?”

“Mm-­hmm . . .”

“What are these cigarettes?”

“German.”

“So you smoke, and you smoke the enemy’s cigarettes. That is treason against the Motherland.”

This was my first and last cigarette.

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Top reviews from the United States

Tatiana
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Difficult but important read
Reviewed in the United States on July 13, 2019
I didnt know this book was published in Russian in 1985 and as a consequence only read this now and in English. The emotional toll it took on me reading it was still immense and I read it beginning to end in one sitting. I am currently deployed and at a certain safe... See more
I didnt know this book was published in Russian in 1985 and as a consequence only read this now and in English. The emotional toll it took on me reading it was still immense and I read it beginning to end in one sitting. I am currently deployed and at a certain safe distance seeing the war in Syria and even my homeland of Eastern Ukraine and helplessly heartbroken imagining new generations having their psyches be shaped by war. Read this book to really feel if only for a second, before closing the book to go on with regular war-free life
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Karel Kriz
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
just small children
Reviewed in the United States on August 6, 2019
Last witnesses: Svetlana Alexievich, the Nobel Prize-winning writer did it again. The readers familiar with her books, written in the form of interviews with the participants of the tragic affairs like the various wars of recent Russian history, know her method of... See more
Last witnesses:
Svetlana Alexievich, the Nobel Prize-winning writer did it again. The readers familiar with her books, written in the form of interviews with the participants of the tragic affairs like the various wars of recent Russian history, know her method of writing. What is her subject now? That children would be the heroes of this book might surprise some of the readers. Yes, innocent beings from two to fifteen years of age exposed to us another cruel side of the war. Each chapter’s heading contains a phrase describing its main topic followed by the name of the person interviewed, now an adult man/woman, his/her profession and his/her age during the war. The author carefully selected in her book over one hundred accounts built on interviews of many more grownups who were willing to retell the terrible horrors of their childhoods. Although I was aware of the German atrocities in Russia during the war there, I was still surprised how many Russian men fought the invaders as partisans. When a partisan was caught the penalty was paid by the whole village: all the inhabitants, men and women were shot, village burnt to the ground and the children dragged away to the concentration camps or taken care of by grandparents or simply by neighbors. No wonder that majority of surviving children were orphans. The story of each man and woman had its individual color but some common themes emerge: patriotism, persistence, love for children, art of inventiveness. However the complicated Russian soul might be mirrored by this quote: “I long ago lost my faith in Stalin, in Communist ideas. I would like to forget that part of my life, but I keep those feelings in my heart. That loftiness. I do not want to forget those feelings. They are precious…”
Two questions appear: First, did the author misuse the children-adults asking them to retell their nightmares? The writer swears that the interviewed who could not go again through their traumas, were not forced and their consciences were protected. Second, why we should read this book? The answer is obvious: Because it happened. The children suffered tremendously; at least by reading their stories we can empathize with them and honor their sacrifices.
31 people found this helpful
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Mr. John Egan
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
subtly brilliant
Reviewed in the United States on August 3, 2019
Alexievich''s method--using the words of interview subjects to craft almost the entire book--is brilliant in its own right. This book''s focus on the memories of adults who were children during World War 2 (the Great Patriotic War) has two risks. First, how well will an adult... See more
Alexievich''s method--using the words of interview subjects to craft almost the entire book--is brilliant in its own right. This book''s focus on the memories of adults who were children during World War 2 (the Great Patriotic War) has two risks. First, how well will an adult memory convey the child''s sense of events. Second, how well can such accounts offer a richness of language and perspectives? In the end, neither is an issue. Alexievich has crafted a narrative of vignettes that are almost musical: there are many micro chapters and only a handful that run over three "pages" (in the Kindle edition). As in her other books, the writing is rhythmic , precisely so.

The take-away from the book is that war is terrible, especially for children. There was nothing "great" about this war. Or any war. War is terrible, especially for children.
12 people found this helpful
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Ron Walsh
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
History is not always pretty
Reviewed in the United States on August 4, 2019
Books like this are important for people to read, not because they are easy or fun to read, but because they tell the side of history that movies do not tell. They tell of the true horrors of war, of those who suffer without ever taking up arms.
15 people found this helpful
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Richard C. Donovan
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
The book was written in 1985
Reviewed in the United States on July 7, 2019
No one has mentioned that this book was written and published in the Soviet Union in 1985. Owing to the author’s Noble fame, it is only now being released in translation in the U.S. Thirty-four years ago those children from the Great Patriotic War had better memories than... See more
No one has mentioned that this book was written and published in the Soviet Union in 1985. Owing to the author’s Noble fame, it is only now being released in translation in the U.S. Thirty-four years ago those children from the Great Patriotic War had better memories than today, so that’s a plus. I bought the book and will begin my read.
13 people found this helpful
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MPFried
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Powerful read
Reviewed in the United States on July 8, 2019
As always, Alexievich delivers an engrossing story of the people of the Soviet Union using their own voices. I have read all of her books and it''s easy to see why she is a Nobel Prize winner for her work.
11 people found this helpful
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JDC
4.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Moving Interviews
Reviewed in the United States on July 28, 2019
This is a moving volume of interviews with Russians recollecting their childhood experiences in WW2. The interviews are excellent and present a horrific picture of life in the Soviet Union during that period as well as showing the great heroism of the Soviet people.... See more
This is a moving volume of interviews with Russians recollecting their childhood experiences in WW2. The interviews are excellent and present a horrific picture of life in the Soviet Union during that period as well as showing the great heroism of the Soviet people. Unfortunately the book seems to have been written in 1985 while the communists were still in power so one has to wonder how much of the history was distorted to make it past the censors. Unfortunately there is no introduction so there is no indication of how the book was put together.
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zinnia
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Fantastic
Reviewed in the United States on October 21, 2019
We, in America, in particular should know what a war is really like. Right now we are in a constant state of war but we don''t feel the direct effects. This book tells it like it is. It is important to note that the book was written in 1985 but it has taken 34 years for... See more
We, in America, in particular should know what a war is really like. Right now we are in a constant state of war but we don''t feel the direct effects. This book tells it like it is. It is important to note that the book was written in 1985 but it has taken 34 years for it to be translated into English. The people who are remembering the war are in their 40''s. Alexeivich chooses her stories so that you feel you have had the experience. I don''t know which of her books is my favorite. They are all worth reading.
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Thomas Oscar Gerrard
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
The experiences of others.
Reviewed in the United Kingdom on August 25, 2019
I was a child, evacuated from Manchester during the war, so it was good to hear of the experiences of others, evacuated in more difficult circumstances.
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